Nov
20
2011

Botox for Migraine Sufferers

Health Canada Gives The Thumbs Up

Botox for Migraine Sufferers

There's a new reason for chronic migraine sufferers -- most of whom are women -- to smile. Health Canada has given doctors the go-ahead to use Botox injections in adults who get migraines 15 or more days a month, according to the Globe & Mail.

While Botox is commonly used as a temporary cosmetic procedure to reduce the appearance of facial wrinkles, regularly injecting 195 units of Botulinum toxin A into seven muscles in the head and neck has been found to keep migraines at bay.

Although Health Canada announced in 2009 that the neurotoxin used in Botox may also spread to other parts of the body, no doubt many sufferers will be delighted to go under the needle if it helps ease their migraine attacks which the World Health Organization claims can be more disabling than "blindness, paraplegia or rheumatoid arthritis."

The triggers of migraines vary, from stress and diet to sleep habits. Ironically, the side effects for Botox treatment include droopy eyes, muscle pain, bronchitis – and migraines.

Migraine sufferer? I am, but certainly not 15 times a month. Will you give Botox a try?

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Nov
17
2011

Miley Cyrus Fights Back

F-Word Accusations

Miley Cyrus Fights Back

Like many celebrities before her, Miley Cyrus used her Twitter platform to rant about critics who've recently commented on her weight.

“By calling girls like me fat this is what you’re doing to other people,” tweeted Ms. Cyrus, attaching a photo of a "severely emaciated woman."

“I love MYSELF & if you could say the same you wouldn’t be sitting on your computer trying to hurt others.”


The 18-year-old child star then posted another shot: of Marilyn Monroe wearing a one-piece bathing suit. “PROOF that you can be adored by thousands of men, even when your thighs touch,” read the caption.

“I don’t wanna be shaped like a girl I LOVE being shaped like a WOMAN & trust me ladies your man won't mind either ;)”


While Ms. Cyrus was on the right track, she went wrong by insisting that women's body image hinges on male approval.

Good for her for speaking out. We need more young feisty women like Ms. Cyrus and her friend, fellow ex-Disney star Demi Lovato, who re-tweeted Ms. Cyrus, saying “AMEN!” to the anti-fat sentiment.

Ms. Lovato previously sought treatment in 2010 after losing her voice on stage from chronic purging. She too lashed out on Twitter following comments on her weight: “I’ve gained weight. Get over it. That’s what happens when you get out of treatment for AN EATING DISORDER.”

Feistiest of all was probably British actress, Kate Winslet, who shamed GQ magazine back in 2003 into apologizing for Photoshopping her legs into "tiny sticks."

Do celebrities affect your own body image, or do you feel removed from the pressure they're under to look thin?

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Nov
17
2011

Twilight Fans Flock to Forks Setting

Take a Twication

Twilight Fans Flock to Forks Setting

Have you ever read a book where you felt like you knew the characters personally? A book you never wanted to end? Well, every now and then a series comes along which attracts die hard disciples. Harry Potter was one such series, Twilight another.

Ever since the vampire saga was published, fans have flocked to -- and overwhelmed -- the sleepy American towns, Forks and La Push Washington, featured in the novels by Stephenie Meyer. You can imagine the shock to residents of these former ghost towns, with hundreds, sometimes thousands, of visitors pouring in every day.

The tourists, who aren't limited to teenage girls, photograph the local school, doctor's office, and residential houses -- all in pursuit of an "authentic Twilight experience."

Researchers from Mid Sweden University are now releasing a book of their own -- about the phenomenon of literary tourism: "I populärkulturturismens fotspår -- Twilight + Vacation = Twication©."

"People create emotional relationships with characters and places in books and films, and this motivates them to travel. This type of travel often creates powerful experiences, and the interest is being disseminated and developed also through intensive use of sites, blogs, and forums on the Net," says researcher and one of the book's authors, Maria Lexhagen.

The book also looks at the pop culture surrounding the Twilight phenomenon, with chapters on travel and the sense of community among fans, the role of social media, and how new literary destinations can take advantage of such marketing opportunities.

Indeed, if you've seen the dolls and various collectibles, you'll know that commercial fiction like Potter and Twilight reaches far beyond book sales. I've even heard of brands paying authors to be penned into their fictional works.

"A key to successfully developing tourism in the wake of movies and literature is increased collaboration between tourism and other creative businesses, as well as enhanced mutual understanding of the business logics of each industry," says another researcher and book author, Christine Lundberg.

The Swedes' book will be released on November 15. You guessed it, in time to coincide with the release of Breaking Dawn, the final instalment of the Twilight films.

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